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Future simple

Future simple construction: will/shall + infinitive

Example verb: do

I will do  We will do
You will doYou (guys) will do
He/she/it will do  They will do
(1) We use the future simple to express a promise.
  • They will allow you to go through.
  • He shall be present tomorrow at the meeting.
  • will do my best.
(2) We use the future simple to express a prediction about the future.
  • His birthday will bring much happiness to the people.
  • Next year will be a great surprise.
  • I don’t know what will happen if it doesn’t succeed.
(3) The future simple is used to express a voluntary action, usually, it is used for a spontaneous decision right at the moment as we’re making it.
  • Can you help me, please? Yes, I will help you right this instant.
  • Could you send me the check, please? Yes, I will send it now.
  • He shall prepare your lunch sir.
  • He will make the order.
(4) Note that, there are many similarities between will and the ‘be going to’ form. For instance, both can mean ‘an intention’, or ‘a prediction’. 
 An intention:
  • ‘I am going on vacation in March’. or ‘I will go on vacation in March’.
A Prediction:
  • ‘I think this man is going to be the next president’. or ‘I think this man will be the next president’. 

English Verbs – The Complete Guide

Lesson #25: Future simple

Explanation

Construction: will/shall + infinitive  

Example verb: clean

I will clean  We will clean
You will cleanYou (guys) will clean
  He/she/it will clean    They will clean
  • We use the future simple to talk about the future whether it be experiences or actions that will happen in the future.
  • The future simple is used to express promises, predictions and intentions about the future.
  • We use the future simple to express a voluntary action. Usually it is used for a spontaneous decision right in the moment as we’re making it.
  • We can use the future simple almost interchangeably with the ‘be going to’ form to express our intentions, and short-term future actions or experiences.
Context

(At the office)

  • What will you do this year, Ann?1 Have you got any plans?2
  • I certainly do have some plans.3
  • Well, spill the beans then!4
  • This year I shall need to get back to learning English.5
  • Really? So how are you going to do that?6
  • With courses, silly. I’m currently doing a course on grammar with a company called English Reservoir.7 Have you heard of them?8
  • I don’t believe I have heard of them. Are they any good?
  • Yes, they’re fantastic! I really love their method. It’s super didactive, fun and dynamic.
  • So why are you learning English?9
  • I told myself this year that I will travel more, meet more people and move up the corporate ladder.10 That’s why.
  • English is definitely important,11 there’s no doubt about that. I was just wondering though,12 would you mind giving me a hand with my work?13
  • Sure, I’ll help you in just a second.14
  • I just need to get this task done before I go. I appreciate it.
  • Don’t mention it.
Analysis
  1. What will you do this year, Ann? The future simple (will do) is used here to talk about the future.
  2. Have you got any plans? We use the modal and auxiliary verb ‘have’ to show possession. Here, plans is what is being possessed.
  3. I certainly do have some plans. ‘Do’ is being used for emphasis in this example. Instead of saying, I have plans, ‘do’ is used to give more emphasis. We use ‘do’ to give emphasis in English. I.e. I like computers = no emphasis. I do like computers = emphasis.
  4. Spill the beans. An expression meaning ‘to tell the secret’ or ‘say what you’re hiding’.
  5. This year I shall need to get back to learning English. The future simple ‘shall need’ is used here to talk about the future. ‘Shall’ is a less common form, and most people just use ‘will’.
  6. So how are you going to do that? The form ‘be going to’ is used here instead of the future simple to express an intention. It would also be correct to say, so how will you do that? ‘Will’ and ‘be going to’ are basically interchangeable.
  7. I’m currently doing a course on grammar with a company called English Reservoir. The present continuous is used here, ‘I’m currently doing’ to describe a temporary state.
  8. Have you heard of them? The present perfect is used here ‘have you heard’ because due to the nature of the experience it continues until the present moment.
  9. So why are you learning English? The present continuous ‘are you learning’ is used because the action is either happening in the moment or the action is a temporary or permanent state.
  10. Move up the corporate ladder. An expression meaning ‘to ascend’ or ‘climb’, metaphorically, in a business environment. Generally, it means to ‘better oneself in any working hierarchy’.
  11. English is definitely important. Remember, adjectives such as, important, nice, friendly take the auxiliary verb be. In this example, is, is the third person singular of be and the adjective is important.
  12. I was just wondering though. Remember, the expression ‘just wondering’ is very commonly used amongst native speakers, and is used, generally, when the speaker wants or desires something. It’s a way to sound less demanding and assertive.
  13. Would you mind giving me a hand with my work? ‘To give a hand’ is a common expression meaning ‘to help’, but not in an urgent sense. I.e. can you give me a hand with the housework?
  14. Sure, I’ll help you in just a second. The future simple is used here ‘I’ll help’ because the response is willing and immediate. The future simple is used to give willing and immediate responses in English. I.e., Would you mind lending me a hand? Of course, I’ll lend you a hand.

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